Over 1700 years in the making . . .

I really hate to come across as your typical conspiracy theorist, but sometimes things happen for which no other interpretation seems accurate. One such thing happened to me, this morning.

Some of you may recall past blogs I’ve written within which I speculated about the story of Jesus of Nazareth. If you allow for the possibility of him being a real, flesh and blood human being then you have to accept that he was born, had a child-hood, and a life before he began his public ministry at the age of 30. So, for years (decades, even) I’ve been asking clergy from many different sects of Christendom one particular question.

Who taught Jesus the path to enlightenment?

Seems like a simple enough question, right? Well, for decades Christian ministers have been telling me answers like this:

Nobody really knows where he went to school.

As part of the God-head, he just knew.

He wasn’t really human, just God in a human form to show us the way to salvation.

Those answers may feel really comforting to some people, but as a person who is genuinely hungry to also become an enlightened master, they don’t do squat for me.

Finally, after years of search, I found a clue in the writings of a 1st Century AD Jewish historian. Josephus Flavius – usually just referred to as Josephus. He wrote a lot about conditions in Israel during the life of Jesus and the first few decades after. He was also very highly esteemed – at different points in his life he served as an ambassador to Rome and as the Governor of Galilee.

Josephus describes in detail one particular sect of the Jews, which he said was called the “Essenes”. The Essenes were, Josephus said, a very tight-knit group who would recognize a visiting Essene from another town or province instantly. In his writings he names 3 Essenes in particular. Two were cousins – John the Baptist and Jesus. And to remove any doubt on his qualification to name them – the third he names is himself.

After I learned of Josephus’ declaration of Jesus’ religious affiliation, I began to look for authentic materials on the teachings of the Essene sect.

Last week I hit pay-dirt. I found a small book through one of my book-swap clubs. It was simply titled, “The Essene Gospel of Peace”. I requested it, and got it a couple of days ago. Wednesday morning I had an appointment to get repairs done on our car, and took that book with me to read while I waited.

Two hours later I was so mad I could hardly see straight. So far, everything I’ve learned from TEGP about Jesus’ public ministry points to one thing. For TEGP to be right, the “Holy Bible” is a fraud. Checking out the truth of TEGP shouldn’t be difficult, either – it goes into considerable detail of the methods used by Jesus to facilitate healing. Everything is covered, from dietary rules to ritual bathing. Daily schedules include how much time to spend working your garden, or in prayer or study.

In fact, so far (and I’m not through with even half of the book yet) the entire book is devoted to MORTAL purification. Those things covered are all things that everyone can do to live a healthier life. And Jesus’ references to Satan? In every instance, Satan is a term applied to physical ailments suffered by those who have not lived according to the natural laws of life Jesus was teaching. In one instance, when Jesus “cast Satan out” of a terribly ill man, “Satan” was a tape worm nearly as long as the man himself.

I’m going to keep reading. In part, I hope to find some information which will refute the belief growing in me of the degree of error in the Bible. It feels so great of a betrayal that only a deliberate series of acts would have succeeded in creating it, and that isn’t “error.” I also intend to begin preparations for following Jesus’ healing rituals, as described in this book.

Updates will follow.

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5 thoughts on “Over 1700 years in the making . . .

  1. For TEGP to be right, the “Holy Bible” is a fraud.And this comes as a surprise?
    I’m going to keep reading. In part, I hope to find some information which will refute the belief growing in me of the degree of error in the Bible. It feels so great of a betrayal that only a deliberate series of acts would have succeeded in creating it, and that isn’t “error.”Welcome to organized religion. Sorry if that sounds cynical, but … organized religion, for the most part, is a tissue of formalized lies devised to give power and control over credible people. I regard organized religion as a weakness of humanity, a mass mental delusion, that I can only hope we will eventually mature out of. It actively gets in the way of individual spiritual development and wisdom by teaching its followers “Think this way, and no other. This is mandatory, all else is forbidden. This is holy, all else is evil. We are the chosen people, all others are infidels.”

  2. I can’t really disagree with you about organized religion. My observation is that the higher you go within any particular group, the more the leadership use flowery words to pat themselves on the back while telling you that you’re not cutting it. Remember Jerry Fallwell and Jim Baker? Real pillars of faith, weren’t they?

    There is one exception to my observation that I should note: the first generation of a new religious movement. The originators seem to always be zealous for truth and betterment of individual spirituality. But, historically, it hasn’t ever taken long for decay to set in at the very highest levels. The second or third “chosen” leader (after the founder) is nearly always corrupt.

    We’ve even had the chance to observe this in action within the last century – The Church of Scientology.

  3. Remember Jerry Fallwell and Jim Baker? Real pillars of faith, weren’t they?Not to mention, say, Jim Jones….

    The Church of Scientology is a little different; it was a fraud from the start. It started out from a bet between L. Ron Hubbard and John Campbell that Hubbard could start a new religion. By the time he died, the poor SOB wasn’t even allowed to use his own name because the Church of Scientology effectively owned all rights to it. (That, as I understand it, is why Battlefield Earth was published posthumously — the Co$ had an injunction forbidding Hubbard to use his own name for any commercial purpose, but it didn’t cover his estate.)

  4. Hmmm . . . interesting. Your information about the reason for Hubbard’s publication of Battlefield Earth posthumously seems to be missing something. The Co$ is administering his estate through Author Services – a division of Bridge Publications. Author Services holds the copyrights to all his fiction, including Battlefield Earth. Or, at least that is what I’ve heard.

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