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Saturday Posts . . .

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Real life lessons in video games . . .

As an adult person who admits to playing video games, I often see/hear criticism of games and those who play them. Somehow it is perceived as somewhere between juvenile and a total waste of time. Therefore, I’d like to offer some lessons I’ve seen taught within video games that are totally appropriate to apply to real life.
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Every game has rules, playing fields, boundaries, players, and non-players. Some players are allies, others opponents.

Are you a non-player or a player? Or, to put it another way – who controls your actions? If not you, then who?

The fastest route to your destination might not be the most direct.

Don’t rely only on one skill. The more options you have, the greater your chances of success.

One person willing to try will always make more of a difference than 1000 people doing nothing.

The most powerful player doesn’t always win.

The villain most to be feared isn’t the insane wildcard who is unpredictable. No, the one to fear is the cold, calculating sane one who honestly believes his posturing and power-grabbing will be of benefit to everyone else.

Just because the majority deems something impossible, that does not guarantee that they are right.

Timing is key – something impossible today may be easy tomorrow.

Nothing succeeds like perseverance – except patience.

Every decision you make is a choice, and every choice defines both who you are and who others believe you to be.

Never attack, or undermine, your team mates.

Always give a fair exchange for goods/services you use. If possible, give more than what others perceive it to be worth. Wealth isn’t hoarded, it is shared. If you make sure everyone around you is prosperous, I guarantee you will be too.

What you call “real life” behaves entirely within the rules of advanced games theory.

One of Life’s Truths

I’ve been doing some reading, thinking, and meditating (after a fashion), and believe I’ve hit on something worth sharing. I hope it helps all who read it.

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You will never get more back from life than you give to it, without paying a terrible price. There are people like Donald Trump, who build vast empires seemingly with ease, but their fortunes are bought with the poverty of their relationships.

LIKE ATTRACTS LIKE

If you desire to have a perfect spouse, seek first to be a perfect partner.
If you deisre to gain the perfect job, seek to be the perfect employee.
If you desire perfect friends, endeavor to never be a false one.

If you fill your home, heart, and life with jealousy, contempt, lust, or hate, this is what will return to you from the lives around you. As Jesus said, “That which you sow, you shall also reap.” Live your life with love, generosity, beauty, and joy, and you will indeed receive the life of all who are heirs to the Kingdom of Heaven.

As a final thought, I would add to the above PATIENCE. Keep at it. Nothing worth doing happens overnight, and nothing worth being can be lived only one day. If you are only doing it to reap the rewards, you will not be able to stay with it long enough for the rewards to find you. On the other hand, if your reasons are true, and you desire that EVERYONE else gains what you desire for yourself, no force on earth can stop your very words from making it happen.

Point of View – a lesson

One day a father of a very wealthy family took his son on a
trip to a farm with the firm purpose of showing his son how
poor people live. They spent a couple of days and nights on
the farm of what would be considered a very poor family.

On their return from their trip, the father asked his son,
“How was the trip?”

“It was great, Dad.”

“Did you see how poor people live?” the father asked.

“Oh yeah,” said the son.

“So, tell me, what did you learn from the trip?” asked the father.

The son answered, “I saw that we have one dog and they had four.
We have a pool that reaches to the middle of our garden and
they have a creek that has no end. We have imported lanterns
in our garden and they have the stars at night.

Our patio reaches to the front yard and they have the whole
horizon. We have a small piece of land to live on and they
have fields that go beyond our sight.

We have servants who serve us, but they serve others.
We buy our food, but they grow theirs. We have walls
around our property to protect us, they have
friends to protect them.”

The boy’s father was speechless.

Then his son added, “Thanks, Dad, for showing me how poor we are.”

Isn’t perspective a wonderful thing? Makes you wonder what
would happen if we all gave thanks for everything we have,
instead of worrying about what we don’t have.

Appreciate every single thing you have, especially your friends!

Please pass this page on to friends and acquaintances to
help them refresh their perspective and appreciation.
“Life is too short and friends are too few.”