Saturday Posts . . .

Just a few hours ago, I was binge watching the tubi show I’ve posted about before, when I heard a loud sound that made me think of a car accident. I grabbed my cane and phone, and headed for the porch in time to see a vehicle’s tail lights heading south from an impact with the “stoplight signal ahead” sign just south of our house. I called the police to report it, and for the next 20 minutes there was a lot of activity outside. I gave a statement to the police, along with several other people who are neighbors and gave similar reports, but I also helped the 1st officer on the scene locate evidence that might possibly lead to identifying the vehicle. It was a very rewarding experience, to me.

Honestly, I may have missed my calling. I have the awareness and attention to detail to be a Crime Scene Investigator (CSI).

Saturday Posts . . .

Last night after my wife went to bed, I began to watch the movie “Gladiator” again. I’ve seen it many times before, but in light of the book I’ve been recently reading, I was impressed by one very simple moment early in the story in a whole new way.

In that scene, the lead character “General Maximus” notices a small bird perched on a branch not far from him just before his final battle as a general of the Roman Army. The bird notices him, also, and they look at each other for several seconds without any comment or action before the bird flies away.

As I watched that scene, several ideas presented themselves to me.

  1. Wild animals do not care about nations, religions, or political ideologies. They go where they will, do what they will, and have survived for aeons despite our best efforts to ruin the planet. No bird has to apply for a visa to enter a new country. No wolf has to explain to a government why it won’t remarry after it’s 1st spouse is killed. No bear ever had to apply for a license to catch fish for it’s cubs.
  2. Modern society almost never thinks about the welfare of any part of nature, and even when it does it either over reacts or discounts it entirely. We should learn to view ourselves as participants in nature, not the masters of it. We cannot survive by destroying the natural resources that provide the elements of survival we require – earth, air, fire, water – and FOOD.
  3. I’m well aware that many liberals would denounce the consumption of meat on numerous different principles – but there are things they have never addressed which are more compelling than all other arguments (imho). The prevailing theories of evolution state that we would have never developed the brain capacity to solve problems at the level we have if we had not begun to eat meat long ago. Will we continue to have such mental capacity if we stop eating meats? Also, our dental development is uniquely suited to both eating meat and vegetables, and finally, NO animal with both a small and large intestine is a vegetarian.

Universal Truth . . .

Ever since my parents divorced, in a very acrimonious action, when I was 16 years old, I’ve been searching for something beyond what they tried to teach me. Over the years, I’ve come to call it the “Universal Truth” – a point where all religion and philosophy agreed.

This Universal Truth has eluded me. It always felt that I was just on the verge of discovering it, but somehow was just out of reach. I’ve studied Sigmund Freud, Emanuel Khant, every major religion extant on the earth, and the teachings of any extinct religion I could find. My studies included Richard Bach, Jed McKenna, Dr. Zhi Ghan Sha, Deepak Chopra, Eckhart Tolle, Michael Talbot, and Dan Millman – just to name a few.

Never did I feel I’d come close to what I sought, until my dear friend and spiritual sister Anita suggested that I read one particular book. That book is titled “The Voice of Knowledge” by don Miguel Ruiz. His book is based on the ancient wisdom of the Toltecs, but unlike any of the other books I’ve read, it is written so simply, so clearly, that a grade-school student with a good vocabulary and the understanding of using a dictionary could comprehend it.

I read half of the book in one evening. While I was doing so, I quickly came to the realization that I would not only recommend it to others (which I’m doing now), but that I will definitely read it many more times. This is spiritual GOLD. If you haven’t read it, and have any interest in personal self-improvement, this book is a MUST.

Another difficult call . . .

but this one wasn’t a phone call. It was a decision about a letter. I wrote the letter to my dad, and wrestled with it for a week. The decision was about the temptation to post a copy of it here. This morning I concluded that it should not be shared, because I couldn’t find any way that it’s personal and family information would actually help anyone else.

Except for one thing that isn’t personal or family information. It’s about a problem in our world that affects everyone in some way or other. So, I’m going to write this as an opinion piece to the whole world.

There is a misunderstanding that is one of the most fundamental we face. The differences between an opinion, a fact, and faith.

At the most basic, most people think they know what each of these 3 things is. However, when it comes to applying that knowledge, the meanings get blurred.

We accept that one person may not like our favorite sports team, or prefer one city over another, or prefer tea over coffee. Everyone knows that those are matters of opinion, and we generally respect those opinions.

We also know that a fact is something that is able to be tested, and proved, over and over by anyone trained to examine it. A fact is that riding a motorcycle without a helmet at low speeds is more risky than using the helmet. It is also a fact that the helmet probably won’t save your life in an accident at highway speeds, because the helmet can’t protect your neck.

But our real problem on this planet is the number of people who mistake faith for facts. The only difference between faith and an opinion is the religious nature of faith. Faith is an expressed belief in something that can’t be proved – thus it is an opinion on religion. Missing that one thing is why so much strife exists in our world anytime religions clash.

Please, people, learn to treat your own faith, and the faith of anyone who disagrees with it, as an opinion. Religious zeal has already caused too many wars, ruined families, and hatred among us. It is arguably, historically speaking, the #1 cause of preventable death globally.

Love really is the answer.

Black and White . . .

On this day, one week before the start  of a new semester at the local university, I’d like to address something that all college students will be faced with throughout the coming year . . . the ongoing battle of good versus evil.

It’s so pervasive, and long lived, that the terms we have to speak of it are myriad – yet probably none approach the universal use and recognition of “black and white”.  Black – the color that represents the equal presence of all colors; white – the color that represents the absence of all colors.  Those terms have nearly eternally been recognized as the short-hand reference to the battle between good and evil.  Yet, I have a simple observation to point out that doesn’t get near the attention that it merits.

Good cannot exist in the absence of evil, and evil cannot exist in the absence of good.

Consider the typical, fully charged, battery.  You pick it up, hold it in your hand, and know that it has the power to potentially do wonderful things.  But it will do NOTHING until it is plugged into a circuit.  Electricity is just a potential until it has somewhere to go.  The same is true with an idea.  Thus, it does not matter what your idea of a better universe is (and I guarantee that someone out there considers it to be evil), it NEEDS the presence of an oppositional idea to have somewhere to go, something to do.

Good and evil need each other to serve any purpose for those of us who invest time in thinking about them.  Thus, it is an eternal waste of effort to invest yourself in the eradication of whatever idea is opposed to yours.  I guarantee two things.  If you succeed, it will be the death of your goal, because your goal will no longer serve a purpose.  And , even if you consider that to be a fair trade, there are others out there who feel the same about beating your idea.

This apples universally – most especially to religion and politics.  Thus, we need to all take a step back, a deep breath, and consider from a point of genuine sanity that what we honestly need is not a victory, but the ability to embrace in tolerance the ideas we most hate.

For those who enjoy reading anything that is not required for a course, or for work, there is one book I will recommend you read before this calendar year (2018) is completed:

GNOSTICISM: New Light on the Ancient Tradition of Inner Knowing – by Stephan A. Hoeller

Shout it out loud . . .

Healthy People 2020 and The Decade of Vaccines – is an article that describes an official government policy 35 years in the making, with the ultimate goal to justify a nanny state government take-over of nearly every aspect of your personal life.  All in the name of “public health issues”.  You can read the full article here:

 

http://agenda21news.com/2015/03/healthy-people-2020-and-the-decade-of-vaccines/

Just spit it out . . .

I’ve had an idea for a post rattling around in my head for weeks now, but I never thought I had it together enough to write a blog with it.  Part of the problem is that I haven’t slept well in ages, it seems.  I go to bed, and a half hour later my body hurts so bad that I get back up.  Or – I have a migraine and don’t sleep anyhow.  When I do sleep, I get perhaps 3 hours before I roll over on my hip or shoulder, and wake myself up.

Anyhow, I decided to just toss this out there, and see what everyone thinks.  Please forgive that it isn’t very polished.

It’s about Illusions.  I was a youngster when I first read Richard Bach’s “Johnathan Livingston Seagull” – and that was probably my first brush with Illusions as a concept of reality in this world.  A follow-up book by the same author was “Illusions: the Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah”.    I’ve never tried to hide the fact that I think this world is not real – but recently I started to ponder the deeper question:  If it isn’t real, why do so many believe that it is?

As I pondered that question – I began to realize that my video games held a clue, even if accidentally.  THEY are created illusions, and people actually pay money to dive into them for entertainment.  As I looked at this, I realized that each illusion world was supported by MANY other, lesser, illusions built into the world, that define what the world is and how it works.  When people accept the rules of that world, playing the game becomes “real” to them for as long as they are plugged into it.

Which leads to a supplemental question about OUR world – what illusions exist to define it, that are accepted by so many people as to make it “real” to them?

Over the last couple of weeks, I have attempted to formulate a list of such illusions.  I don’t really know the best way to present this, so I’m going to just make it a list.

Dignity, Morality, Nobility, Organized Religion, family, society, nations, governments, power, success, wealth, health, pain, illness, possessions,  duty, honor, sacrifice, obligation.

There is a proof to the fact that these things are illusions – just challenge someone else with the idea that one of them isn’t real and watch their reaction.  If they bought into it, they will become livid over the suggestion that they are wrong – but they can’t PROVE they are right.  They can only prove they are willing to use force to make you withdraw the accusation.